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Decolonizing Critical Discourse Studies – special issue

Regarding an already consolidated tradition in discourse studies in the Global South, with featured importance in graduate programs and a busy calendar of annual events in the field, it is possible to say that there is considerable amount of imported knowledge being applied and very little creativity in local theoretical or methodological production. This issue of Critical Discourse Studies seeks to address this particular problem, relating coloniality of knowledge, power and being to research and teaching in the field of discourse analysis. Themes to be addresses in candidate papers could be related to:

– issues of identity and social relations: how does the coloniality of knowledge, power and being impact our self-perception as academics and our relationships with our peers?

– questions of research themes: how does the coloniality of knowledge, power and being impact on the selections of themes we approach in research, and blocks other possible themes anchored in our particular contexts?

– theoretical questions: how the coloniality of knowledge, power and being imposes theoretical choices, not always the most pertinent to our research themes? How does the coloniality of knowledge, power, and being impact on the possibilities of theoretical creation in the field, crystallizing canons and blocking change?

– methodological questions: considering the interest in discourse as language in situated social practices, to what extent can the categories of linguistic analysis be considered as universal? How does the coloniality of knowledge, power, and being impact on the possibilities of methodological creation in the field, crystallizing canons and blocking change?

– pedagogical questions: how does the coloniality of knowledge, power and being impact our pedagogical action? To what extent does our teaching practice contribute to the maintenance of the coloniality of the field and the reproduction of theories and methods?

– questions of resistance: reflections on the spaces of change and the opportunities of facing coloniality by means of discourse/ discourse analysis

– thematic issues related to colonial heritage, and discussed from decolonial thinking: subalternities of race, class, gender and sexuality investigated through discourse analysis – violence, resistance, historical continuities, coloniality of institutions, blockades of access to institutional spaces

Articles should be 6-8000 words maximum, including author details, abstract, and bibliography, and should strictly follow the instructions for authors available on the CDS homepage (https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rcds20&page=instructions).

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